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enforce the laws on the books, but that is not enough. there are so many gaps in these laws that we now they created the situation we face today. the senate will take up proposals to close those gaps and reduce gun violence. we will consider universal background checks for gun sales, tougher gun laws against illegal stock purchasing, stopping the flood of new military-style assault weapons on to our streets, limiting the capacity of new gun magazines to a level that allows for reasonable self-defense but reduces the scope of carnage that a mass shooter can cause. all of these proposals are based on common sense. all of them have strong support among the american public. and all of them, i believe, are clearly consistent with the constitution, the second amendment, and the bill of rights. in the landmark supreme court decision in heller in 2008, the court determined that americans have the individual right to possess firearms for lawful purposes such as self-defense. but justice scalia, no liberal, writing for the court's conservative majority, made clear that the second amendment right
and administrative law and sometimes property, sometimes local government law. >> when you approached the affairs or said the manuscript to a publisher, was the answer back from public affairs and why were they interested in the story? >> well, fortunately i already had a relationship from my first book about the book that's title to the integration why we still study to be in emigrated society. so i had a relationship with them and i sent a proposal to them i think they knew i was a fairly tenacious person, and they also found the story compelling. so thank you, public affairs. >> just a short conversation with george on professor sheryll cashin about her second book, "the agitators' daughter a memoir of four generations of an extraordinary african american family." by the way, booktv covered the professor earlier on this book and it's about one hour in length. you can go to booktv.org and type in her name and you can watch the entire hour. thanks for being with us. >> sarah gordon talks about religious cases in history that have transformed the law of the country and dominated protection in the
americans because they looked like the enemy. the law says we can arrest anyone who looks like san franc and i reside in district 9. i want to thank supervisor chiu. i want to say a couple of things of why the mba and resolutions. you're going to hear from other people testifying behind me today. we could see indefinite military action of things that are indefined in the law. resolutions make the law clear. the law passed without a real debate in the law. and even when the law went to committee we have not seen the kind of debate from an unconstitutional law that can effect our rights under the 5 accounting and 6th and 8th amendment which presents certain things about our troops. and san francisco - i just want to point out that karen spoke a little bit about our faggots story when he has her father was held in san francisco county jail. it's very real and the issue a very real. there's a wide variety of the communities supporting it. we have community - people from community supporting it and next speaker >> i want to thank the members of the board of supervisors who were supporting th
those reports of increaseded law enforcement activity in the big bear area, which is the area where christopher dorner was last known or suspected to have been, i just talked to the spokeswoman here at the police station. we do know that investigators are looking at more than 1,000 clues in their effort to find christopher dorner. >> could this video of a man resembling murder system christopher dorner provide a clue to his whereabouts? the video obtained by tmz shows him walking through the aisles of a southern california sporting goods store, he's carrying what appears to be one large scuba tank and one smaller one to the check out counter. >> they're going to look at the transactions that occurred at that time at that store and try to line up and make sure those transactions were done by dorner and that dorner is actually the one depicted in the video. >> reporter: investigators say last week dorner tried to steal a boat in san diego and his wallet and id were found near the san yisidro port of mexico. in los angeles, reported dorner sightings have poured into the command center.
fan. did you know? [laughter] against the law. just a warning this time. [ laughter ] >> jon: cuff it it's the fuzz. how are you? thanks for joining us. i want to talk about two things. we don't have a ton of time because obviously you are fighting crime. the first thing is going to be guns. there's a huge discussion on guns in this country right now. but it seems like there are lobby groups and advocacy groups, not a lot of law enforcement, seems like they should be the focus of discussion rather than not. is there a reason for that the? is law enforcement not allowed or permitted to take a public stand on what they might favor for gun issue? >> the think the big organizations have been speaking out about it. you saw the president yesterday in minnesota with a group of police officers. so i think parts are engaged, maybe not speak as loud as we could. chuck ram si has been the head of agency has been articulate and outspoken. law enforcement has a personal concern about guns and gun safety. police officers, over 150 a year. >> jon: right. >> shot throughout the country. toes a maj
there are not hostages inside. right now there are no reports of that. so it's him against law enforcement. sbn isolated. they will return fire as he fires at them. basically too much risk of them being injured by his gunfire. they will attempt to take him out with sniper fire if they can. but the preferred course of action would be for him to surrender. they will make efforts to get a communications device into that cabin if in fact he has no telecommunications within. >> it's been described as automatic weapons fire. what would that be? i thought they've all been outlawed since the '30s. >> not at all it's easy to take a semiautomatic weapon and make it into an automatic weapon. >> a machine gun. >> that's right. this is an individual familiar with automatic weapons from the time in the military. >> i skds this an hour or so ago, people under stress like this with their adrenaline rushing, is there an acutability to hit people. he's a trained marine officer, police officer, he could be a good shot. >> even in the best case circumstances, some of the most highly trained officers, i think they hit on th
>> i supported the emergence of that new understanding and the supreme court made it the law of the land in the helen mcdonald decisions. in 2008 and 2010. of that pair of decisions demolishes the slippery slope theory of those who oppose basically all firearms regulation on the view that once we permit any new firearms regulation at all, we will be inviting the government step-by-step to come ever closer to disarm the people. leaving only the police and military with firearms. with heller and mcdonald on the books, supreme court in its own words took certain policy choices off the table. thereby cleared the path a reasonable regulations to be enacted without fear that those policy choices would either open the door to unlimited government control, or be imperiled by exaggerated interpretation of the second amendment. as justice alito put in mcdonald, there's no longer any basis for such doomsday proclamations. justice scalia speaking for the court and heller said at the end of his opinion. under our interpretation, the constitution leaves open a variety of regulatory tools f
be taken in burglaries. >> those bordering states and those are the laws in nevada. >> until last tuesday, california had the strongest gun laws in the united states, arizona the weakest and we are next door >> so someone could go to a gun show across the board and board and border and do that weapon. >> i just have a question regarding the last firearm. on the pictures that we have here, there is rifles, semi, automatic and then there is the assault weapon. the magazine clip, on the semiautomatic, does that change the rifle into a it. >> if you take that banana magazine away that comes under the semiautomatic rifle. >> yes. >> once you put that banana magazine on you it falls down on a fully or modified? >> it would be an assault weapon, semi, auto assault weapon >> another category. >> we can spend a whole day talking about the different ways or the different types of assault weapons that there are. here is another as we speak, it is an assault pistol, which is a mack ten and a 45 caliber and this one is shoot very quickly and accept the magazines up to 30 rounds and the whole magazine
communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
last year said that in interpreting laws it said "we must seek to ascertain and effectuate the purpose of the legislature interpreting each provision in a manner consistent with the purpose in light of the objectives to be achieved" so here you have a san francisco ordinance that says "the purposes to regulate fortuneteller so the city and county can thoroughly investigate fraud" so the police department investigated her, reissued the permit from year to year. she has a dmv identification. even though it's expired her identity didn't change after it expired and i think that a fair application of this law is that the ordinance requirement is met. i mean the police department could still have done an investigation to update the previous one if it wanted but just to block it because she's unidentified where they have a record of hear going back to 1979 with a misdemeanor arrest and took into account when they granted the permit. it shouldn't be a ground for denying the permit and using expired id is consistent as we set out in the brief with the laws in many contexts, more medicare,
at the lapd or used to? >> i think it's law enforcement in general. it does happen. the significant difference with that manifesto is he chose to deem with it in a much better, humane way. cenk: of course. now, i understand in your experience, did this happen when you were an officer? >> yes i saw it happen many times, absolutely. cenk: that's interesting. all right. now, let's talk about the current situation. eugene what are the police doing right now as far as trying to get dorner when he's holed up in that cabin? >> well, it is important to say the police and civilian law enforcement, in our countries it would be pursuit to the death. presuming he's still alive and holed up in the cabin. i hope he'll do everything he can, since he's detained to take him alive and give him the due process he denied other people. the legal system should be paramount here. regrettably, police officers in adhering to their oath put themselves at great risk and other officers today in trying to i think show the best that american law enforcement, you take somebody before the bar of justice and give them their d
the sunshine ordinance task force says, we're not going to do it. we don't care what the law says; we're not going to do it and when it's referred over here, up until this effort op your part to actually enforce it, none more enforced that jul gomez which was basically ignored by the mayor. basically what we're talking about here is denial of due process. the law san francisco gives the citizens the right whente it they have been deadline the opportunity to make public comment, the avenue of going to the sunshine ordinance task force and asking for their assistance. but what good does to do you? you go there and get the orders of determination, and yet, other city agencies including this body, just ignore those determinations. know your rights under the sunshine ordinance is printed on every agenda of every commission and board in this city and every meeting. and yet when people who actually do know their rights under the sunshine ordinance and come before the bodies and simply ask to have their constitutional rights respected, for heaven's sake, they get met with open hostility.
in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the school context is what we're really talking about here and that is 90% of their waking hours. that's their social life. >> and one of the reasons that a lot of researchers and nonprofits don't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
have it in english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've
, local law enforcement, local da's, people who are getting out of their lanes. the old paradigm of a da and a attorney and a police officer, you get bad guys, you put them this jail. you know, i'm telling you, i've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the cou
some restrictions, but you guys are fantastic at bringing in laws. so, maybe you can create some kind of law. you're so good at that. you would be the country to start that, i would be quite certain. we have to go about 10 steps through parliament and it takes 20 years to change a law. i think you can do it overnight. [laughter] >> well, maybe. thank you. (applause) >> we have another answer. >> if i might very quickly. >> yes, of course. >> i have worked with aerosol with youth on murals as well as individual projects. i've also done collage. we've done paint pens. we have used a number of different things from silk screen t-shirts to making logos. my experience with these youth is you might engage them through graffiti. you don't have to use arrow zoll. it's expensive. it's anywhere from 8 to $14 a can wherever you get it. and you also have to then worry about protecting the eyes, the hands and the proper respirator which could be 35 to $50 apiece per youth. so, to me it's a really expensive way to engage that graffiti side of the artistic or creative behavior. at the same time, mon
particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that i
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
's exactly the case. realize, chris, that's one of the scenarios that law enforcement had to the consider. as you know, up in those mountains where they've conducted this massive manhunt, there are literally hundreds of private homes and cottages, some that are occupied and some that aren't. police believe they had done a house-by-house search, but somehow in one of those residences it appear that is dorner had managed to break in, held two people hostage for over an extended period of time, and now perhaps with one hostage attempted to make a break to escape from that area. there are media reports that suggest a vehicle he's driving, a pickup truck, has been wrecked or otherwise run off the road, that dorner has abandoned the vehicle, that he is still armed with a semiautomatic weapon, and there are media reports that a running gun battle is taking place with him and the authorities and that at least two officers, wildlife officers in that area, may have been wounded in the ongoing firefight. >> we know already that he's being held or he's also been officially charged with murder of one
profession. she went from high school valedictorian to princeton graduate to law review editor at yale. she served as a prosecutor and a corporate late gator before she was appointed as a district court judge. while still in her 30s. and then was appointed to the court of appeals. 11 years later she was sworn in as the nation's 111th justice. she tells her personal story in a new memoir. is it called "my beloved world." i am very pleased to have justice sonia sotomayor at this table for the first time. welcome. great to see you. >> thank you, charlie. i'm delighted to be here. >> rose: welcome back to new york. (laughs) >> you know, it will always be the home of my heart. as you may know, i've bought an apartment in washington and it's my new residence. >> rose: i've been reading ant how you're getting to know the neighborhood and all that. >> oh, yes! (laughs) but there's always a part of new york that kind of lights up my insides and my smile. >> rose: so you've written this book. here is what the "new york times" said today in a big story about you. right here on the front page of the "n
in 100 years of no regulations where they were polluting the air, water. chop labor laws. things were booming. the people on the top have always had and the people on the bottom have never had. my mother does not know what these the question is or what the debt limit is. people are blaming barack obama for trying to turn this contrary -- country into a communist country. if you have 5000 young people going to war in iraq and afghanistan, and at the same time, we have thousands of kids going to florida for spring break, the top have always had. as long as the top has, the cheating and lying. take madoff. no one knew who he was before he got caught. he was well respected. look back at this country. it has always been poverty in the poor communities. now, it is spreading out. people are just upset with the fact that a black man is in office. they want to throw the blame on him. it is not him. look at the people who are surrounding him. they are not black people. this country has been made up of immigrants and people come to this country. the true american is the indian. until people real
and it is possible that law enforcement was able to talk to him and at least by voice confirm that it was him, either on the run or in that cabin and try to ascertain whether he had hostages in there. that was clearly one of the big points where everything sort of mellowed at one point during the day. everything stopped when they weren't sure whether they could go in to that cabin and take him out. because they weren't sure if there were hostages. at one point they realized there were not and they went in and we are where we are right now, anderson. >> we don't know a lot of the details of the time line on tear gas being fired, whether they did physically go in or whether once that building caught fire whether they just waited outside. we're waiting to get the operational details on that, how much communication, if any, was there between the suspect and the authorities. the other thing that, miguel, i'm curious about. there's been a lot made about the cooperation and publicly, officials, law enforcement officials have been talking about the cooperation between state, federal and local officials in al
of each other. lapd is here, yes, of course we're being surrounded by law enforcement. >> what about at the scene in big bear? is lapd involved there? >> yes. lapd along with surrounding cities is also a part ofv]yt the incident on highway 38. >> can you tell us the age of the deputy? >> there will be no information released at this time regarding the deputy. >> all family has not been notified now? >> we're notÑ55n releasing information about the deputy. >> okay. >> thank you guys. >> you just heard a live press confrom loama linda. while this is going on a significant amount of activity has been going on at the scene. let's go to jt. >> you can see now on the smoke pouring out we're being very careful not to show any tactical locations. of this special enforcement s.w.a.t. officers on the ground right now we're getting reports there are shots being fired. uncertain if the suspect is firing in an attempt to get away from the fire and flames if so, meaning gunfire of the officers on the ground. as you can see this cabin is right now fully involved with fire. and it's very possible
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
. so, i told you, about our gun laws, and about who can't have a gun, and what guns can't be possessed. thank you, is there any questions about that? >> thanks. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> that is great presentation, thank you very much. captain. >> okay, so now we talked about weapons, and we talked about our gun laws and now, i am going to have captain joseph mcfaden is going to address you and show you number one how we track gun violence in our city and also how we respond to an act of violence involving a act of a weapon or a gun in our city. thank you. >> president mazzucco, commissioners, director hicks good to see you. i have been in front of these commissions just over the past several years for different reasons, mostly, that was a ois director that sergeant crudo now has. >> the first picture that i am showing you here is of our shooting victims' list, dating back to 2008. and upwards to 2012. and we have this steady decrease from 2008 of shooting victims. as you can see in the top chart there, out of the 147 victims, of 2012 that were shot in san francisco, we
ascension. all of that talk about coffee and the gentleman talking about going through law school in the '70s and i can relate to that experience going through night school. having a hard time trying to stay awake during procedures class. i recall a professor making key points and one thing he always said, you should always examine the issue of jurisdiction. i have two primary points on that issue. today as indicated or foreshadowed by brief the appellant decided to file an exemption and declare that they are going to be bond on the jurisdiction of the state of california. the california massage therapy council. i have that, if you could bring up the projector, please? it was filed today. >> what is this document sorry, i missed what you said it was. >> it's entitled -- this first one -- there is two of them. i'm sorry. for a state certified massage establishment. as you can see it's in order and has been received by environmental health section. there is also -- this actually goes to the planning department, but you file it through the health department. there is also a companion do
on together but he proactively came for this bill, s.b. 1506, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that f
that we have, not we but we have a law and some law enforcement are not talking the responsibility or the opportunity. >> commissioner that was a complete go to the fridge and get the box and we went right through the list. marshall, a couple of things. >> commissioner kingsley, and do the prevention piece, i have never looked at the department as a that it is not their forte, i don't think that it should be, they put into place because and because they are doing their best. i think that it is the community responsibility for do the prevention piece and i think that it is the family's responsibility to do the piece. i think that as much partnership in the department and the community agencies and the community to only increase the success. and the prevention efforts. i mean, i just hear that, i always say you are asking the police to do something that we are not trained to do, what i think is their primary responsibility. >> the further that we get and get everybody in harmony on those and working in partnership we will have much more success around the prevention, when it comes to
have come to the conclusion that law should be there for one and all and marriage should not be an exclusive institution. i have a gay man who grew up in a world part of our country in a working-class background and i grew up 20 odd years ago in an environment that made it hugely difficult for me to be open and honest and upfront with my family, friends and workmates about the choices i wanted to make in life and the people wanted to see. that was unacceptable 20 odd years ago, and unacceptable today but for hundreds of thousands of people across the country remains the case. i stand to welcome this historic legislation which i think will end discrimination and send a signal that this house values everybody equally across the country and that signal will deeply affect those people like me at 20 years ago who saw this house vote to equalize the age of consent, the first time i saw on the tv screen other gay people for the first time to speak out. i realized i was not alone and it changed my life. we should remember thousands of gay men and women were put to death in concen
. under current law, we expect the unemployment rate will remain above 7.5% through next year. that would make 2014 the sixth year in a row that unemployment is so high, the longest such period in seven years. -- 70 years. also under current law, we expect budget deficits over the next decade to total about $7 trillion. with deficits so high, the federal debt on the public will remain a larger percentage of gdp than in any year between 1951 to 2012. by the end of the decade, debt would be 77% of gdp, on an upward path. let me elaborate on those points, beginning with the economy and then turning to the budget. we anticipate that economic growth will remain slow this year because the gradual improvement that we see in the underlying economic factors will be offset by a tightening of federal fiscal policy scheduled under current law. the good news is that the effects of the housing financial crisis appear to be gradually waning. we expect an upswing in construction and real estate and stock prices, and the increasing availability of credit will help to spur a cycle of faster growth, employm
. the formation of a joint task force among several law enforcement agencies in southern california to try to catch dorner. up until now individual law enforcement agencies have been investigating the crimes he committed in their jurisdiction and now joining forces to investigate this case together. here's what the assistant chief of the river-side police department had to say about that strategy. >> we're coming together today to catch mr. dorner. what that means is we will look under every rock, we will look around every corner and search mountaintops for him. the riverside police department is pledging every resource to this effort. >> reporter: now back to what led to the firing of christopher dorner in 2007 from the los angeles police department, charlie beck the chief of the l.a. p.d. had to say about that, said i do this not to apease a murderer, i do it to reassure the public their police department is fair and transparent in all things that we do. i asked an l.a. p.d. commander if he believes this may lead dorner to turn himself in. here's what he had to say. >> we're all hoping d
all kinds of employers for violations of civil rights laws. >> host: was defined by executive order? >> guest: is formed by president frank was about and at their request of the attorney general and frank murphy was a big labor guide. he was from michigan. he was a very big supporter of labor union and he goes on to a career as a supreme court justice commences at the product of individual rights as well. >> host: what kind of pricey to get when it was first formed? just go there with him that controversy. a lot of what it does over the course of world war ii i think it can need because it's small and largely flies below the radar screen. >> host: does it still exists? >> guest: i came the civil rights division of the department of justice and 1857, so it doubles in 1957 and becomes its only division aggression against much bigger come, specially in 1864 civil rights act of the 1960 voting rights act. the number of lawyers in it that is gross. in a way to still exist. >> host: how does the civil rights section tie into the title of your book, "the lost promise of civil rights"? >> g
and law enforcement. let us take a listen. >> you will! (shots) again -- we know two officers were wounded today. within the hour. word that one of the two has died. christopher dorner is now suspected in four murders since sunday february 3rd. right now, the suspect is barricaded in a cabin. justine waldman is standing by with more on how the events have unfolded in the last few hours. >> reporter: the los angeles police department gave an update. >> today, about 12: they received a call of a stolen vehicle. near club view drive and this stolen vehicle was similar in appearance to christopher dorner. they immediately conducted a ground and air search that highway 38 & glass road or the suspect flaw fled into the road. and after that, he barricaded himself into a big bea r cabine just moments ago the los angeles police department gave an update on the search for chris dorner. here is a breakdown of how things unfolded today. one of the deputies. police, the fbi and swat teams have been combing the big bear area since last week in what's being considered one of the largest manhunts in south
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